VOTE in November.
Make sure your voice is HEARD this election.

In the heartlands of America, United Sentinel is an independent
organization that’s preserving and protecting
American liberty, values, and heritage.
The Founding Fathers Feared Political Factions Would Tear the Nation Apart

The Founding Fathers Feared Political Factions Would Tear the Nation Apart

The Constitution’s framers viewed political parties as a necessary evil. Today, it may seem impossible to imagine the U.S. government without its two leading political parties, Democrats and Republicans. But in 1787, when delegates to the Constitutional Convention gathered in Philadelphia to hash out the foundations of their new government, they entirely omitted political parties from the new nation’s founding…

The Pilgrims Set Sail For The New World

On September 16, 1620, the Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers. The ship was headed for Virginia, where the colonists—half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs—had…

New Yorker: Local Confederate Monument

The Confederate “Talbot Boys” statue, in Easton, Maryland, remains for the same reason it was erected: not because it is historically accurate or represents the will of the majority but…

People’s House: Loyalists in the Legislature

When the Second Continental Congress convened in 1775, firebrands including Samuel Adams of Massachusetts and Patrick Henry of Virginia steered the 13 colonies of the United States toward a complete break with Great Britain. But that…

The Pilgrims Set Sail For The New World

On September 16, 1620, the Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers. The ship was headed for Virginia, where the colonists—half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs—had been authorized to settle by…

New Yorker: Local Confederate Monument

The Confederate “Talbot Boys” statue, in Easton, Maryland, remains for the same reason it was erected: not because it is historically accurate or represents the will of the majority but because powerful people support it.

People’s House: Loyalists in the Legislature

When the Second Continental Congress convened in 1775, firebrands including Samuel Adams of Massachusetts and Patrick Henry of Virginia steered the 13 colonies of the United States toward a complete break with Great Britain. But that sentiment wasn’t universally shared a…

Battle of Perryville

The Battle of Perryville (also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills) was fought on October 8, 1862, in the Chaplin Hills west of Perryville, Kentucky, as the culmination of the Confederate Heartland Offensive (Kentucky Campaign) during the American Civil…

Battle of Philippi (West Virginia)

The Battle of Philippi—also known mockingly as “The Philippi Races”—was fought on June 30, 1861, in and around Philippi, Virginia (now West Virginia) as part of the Western Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War. It was the first organized land action in the war (the…

Battle of Big Bethel

The Battle of Big Bethel, also known as the Battle of Bethel Church or Great Bethel was one of the earliest land battles of the American Civil War (Civil War) after the surrender of Fort Sumter. The battle between Union Army and Confederate States Army forces on June 10, 1861 took place…

Battle of Fort Donelson

The Battle of Fort Donelson was fought from February 11 to February 16, 1862, in the Western Theater of the American Civil War.

American Revolution: Battles, Biographies,
Events, & Information

The Sugar and Stamp Acts

During the period from 1763 to 1775, in the twelve years after the French and Indian War and before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, colonial distrust of Britain grew…

The Revolution Begins

In 1772, Samuel Adams of Boston created the first Committee Of Correspondence, which was primarily an exchange of ideas in letters and pamphlets among members. Within a few years, this…

The French and Indian War

Unlike the previous wars between European powers in the 1700s, the French And Indian War was begun in North America—in the heartland of the Ohio Valley, where both France and…

The Declaration of Independence

At a meeting of the Second Continental Congress in the summer of 1776, Richard Henry Lee, a delegate from Virginia, proposed that the American colonies should declare their independence from…

The Battle of Yorktown

In 1780, 5,500 French soldiers landed in Rhode Island to try to help their American allies in assaulting British-occupied New York City. The two armies met North of New York…

The Battle of Eutaw Springs

Background Seven years of British determination to bring South Carolina to her knees met failure. The spirit that had long resisted royal edict and church canon, the fierce desire and…

The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

Overview On the bright, late winter day of March 15, 1781, the Revolutionary War came to a remote county seat in north central North Carolina. Guilford Courthouse, with its population…

The Battle of Cowpens

The Battle of Cowpens (January 17, 1781) was a decisive victory by American Revolutionary forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, in the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War. It…

The Battle of Yorktown

In 1780, 5,500 French soldiers landed in Rhode Island to try to help their American allies in assaulting British-occupied New York City. The two armies met North of New York…

The Battle of Eutaw Springs

Background Seven years of British determination to bring South Carolina to her knees met failure. The spirit that had long resisted royal edict and church canon, the fierce desire and…

The Battle of Guilford Courthouse

Overview On the bright, late winter day of March 15, 1781, the Revolutionary War came to a remote county seat in north central North Carolina. Guilford Courthouse, with its population…

The Battle of Cowpens

The Battle of Cowpens (January 17, 1781) was a decisive victory by American Revolutionary forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, in the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War. It…

Over 1,700 documents,
articles, and images archived

We focus on the Discovery of America, Native Indians,
American Revolution, and the American Civil War

George Washington’s Diary

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: diary-image Museum Number: Annotation: Both a manuscript and a printed book, George Washington’s 1762 almanac records activities at his Mount Vernon plantation. He describes mainly planting tobacco…

Pirates in America

Media type: book illustration Annotation: This is an image from the first edition, in Dutch, of one of the most important books about pirates ever written. Alexandre Exquemelin, a native of Harfleur,…

Republican Party Platform, 1856

Date:1856 Annotation: Republican Party Platform of 1856. Document: Republican Party Platform of 1856 This Convention of Delegates, assembled in pursuance of a call addressed to the people of the United States, without…

Custer’s Last Stand

The Battle of Little Big Horn: The Prelude to Disaster It is hard to say how many years ago the Dakota Indians of the Northern Mississippi River began to spill over the [caption id=”attachment_6548″ align=”alignright”…

Seminole

Seminole Indians, a tribe of Florida Indians, made up of two bands of the Creeks, who withdrew from the main body in 1750, and remnants of tribes who had come in contact with the Spaniards. The Seminoles were hostile…

Creek Indians

Creek Indians, members of a noted confederacy whose domain extended from the Atlantic westward to the high lands which separate the waters of the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, including a greater portion of the States of…

Cheyenne Indians

Cheyenne Indians, one of the most westerly tribes of the Algonquian nation. They were seated on the Cheyenne, a branch of the Red River of the North. Driven by the Sioux, they retreated beyond the Missouri. Near…